Global Hawk UAS Study of Climate Changing Stratospheric Water Vapor & Ozone
February 1, 2013
Global Hawk UAS Study of Climate Changing Stratospheric Water Vapor & Ozone
The first science flights of the NASA Global Hawk UAS in the winter portion of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) are set to begin the week of 28 January 2013. Six science flights from Edwards Air Force Base, California are scheduled. The UAS experimental payload includes two NOAA/ESRL instruments measuring water vapor, two measuring ozone and one measuring methane, nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride. Five NOAA/ESRL and six CIRES scientists are at the NASA Dryden facility supporting the missions.
NOAA, NASA: Antarctic ozone hole second smallest in 20 years
October 24, 2012
NOAA, NASA: Antarctic ozone hole second smallest in 20 years
Warmer air temperatures high above the Antarctic led to the second smallest seasonal ozone hole in 20 years, according to NOAA and NASA satellite measurements
Polar Sunrise and the Ozone Hole at South Pole, Antarctica: Sept. 22, 2012
September 20, 2012
Polar Sunrise and the Ozone Hole at South Pole, Antarctica: Sept. 22, 2012
At the bottom of the world, fifty people are looking forward to seeing the sun peek above the horizon on or around September 22 – the first time they have seen the sun in six months. NOAA ESRL/ GMD personnel LTJG Heather Moe and Johan Booth spent the Antarctic winter working at NOAA’s Atmospheric Research Observatory located at the geographic South Pole. The Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, one of three United States research stations in Antarctica, only experiences one sunrise and sunset per year due to its location at 90˚S latitude.
Utah’s winter air quality mystery. NOAA study targets high ozone pollution events in western oil and gas fields
February 7, 2012
Utah’s winter air quality mystery. NOAA study targets high ozone pollution events in western oil and gas fields
NOAA Scientists and colleagues from the Utah Air Quality Division, the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado , and several other institutions launched the Winter Ozone Study in the Uintah Basin. The team is studying the basin with chemistry instruments for six weeks, to understand where the ingredients of ground-level ozone are coming from, and how wintertime temperature inversions and snow on the ground contribute to record-breaking ozone levels.
NOAA, NASA: Significant ozone hole remains over Antarctica
October 20, 2011
NOAA, NASA: Significant ozone hole remains over Antarctica
The Antarctic ozone hole, which yawns wide every Southern Hemisphere spring, reached its annual peak on September 12, stretching 10.05 million square miles, the ninth largest on record. Above the South Pole, the ozone hole reached its deepest point of the season on October 9 when total ozone readings dropped to 102 Dobson units, tied for the 10th lowest in the 26-year record.
South Pole ozone hole update
October 18, 2011
South Pole ozone hole update
Scientists from NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), Global Monitoring Division, are closely watching the development of the Antarctic ozone hole from the South Pole observatory.
Bryan Johnson,  Monitoring ozone at the ends of the Earth
March 30, 2011
Bryan Johnson, Monitoring ozone at the ends of the Earth
Bryan Johnson is an atmospheric scientist at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory who specializes in ozone research. He has a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Montana State University, but after two years working in the oil industry he decided to shift gears. He went on to graduate school and earned a master's in meteorology from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology and a Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Arizona. His current research at ESRL in Boulder, Colo., focuses on monitoring atmospheric ozone and estimating rates of ozone depletion across the globe. And he gets to use really big balloons to do it.