Climate, Drought & Early Warning on Western Native Lands


June 9, 2009

graphic of eagle and drought by Barb DeLuisi, NOAAr4a

Roger Pulwarty from the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) and Doug Kluck from the National Weather Service Central Region were co-hosts of a workshop on Climate, drought and early warning on Western Native Lands held June 9-11, 2009, in Jackson Hole, WY. Early warnings of climate events and threshold points that affect cultural, economic, and environmental resources are becoming increasingly important for preparedness and adaptation as climate changes. In this context the issues of severe sustained drought and increasing rates of environmental change are critical to the future of the Western U.S. in the near and longer terms. NIDIS, in partnership with Sinte Gleska University, Haskell College and the Indigenous Waters Network convened a workshop on assessing and responding to drought and climate impacts on western Native Lands. A watershed approach was proposed with key participants from Native communities and organizations, from major river basins west of the Mississippi River, involved in developing and protecting water and energy resources, wildlife and the environment. Invited participants also included people from internationally shared water systems such as the Columbia, the Great Lakes and the Rio Grande and from national level organizations such as the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT).

This NIDIS program is hosted at PSD where our researchers are instrumental in providing climate information to support implementation of NIDIS.


Contact: Roger Pulwarty More Information: