Workshop on Hurricane Science and Engineering


February 10, 2006

Roger Pulwarty, a research scientist at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division, acted as a principal discussant at a workshop on Hurricane Science and Engineering held Tuesday, February 7, 2006, in Boulder, Colorado. The workshop, conducted by the National Science Foundations' National Science Board, was designed to engage a broad multi-organization, multi-disciplinary dialog on hurricane science and engineering research. The purpose was to inform the Board on university and private sector activities and perspectives on the need for integration of hurricane science and engineering research across all appropriate disciplines in order to improve the Nation's ability to predict, mitigate, and react to hurricanes.

Background:
The devastation resulting from hurricanes is significant and widespread. Since 90% of the U.S. population lives in continually expanding regions within 200 miles of the coastline, the U.S. is increasingly vulnerable to hurricanes. The purpose of the workshop was to inform the Board on activities and perspectives on the need for integration of hurricane science and engineering research across all appropriate disciplines in order to improve the Nation's ability to predict, mitigate, and react to hurricanes. It was the second of three workshops to elicit federal, research and state and local community recommendations, respectively.

Significance:
The information gathered by the Board will be used to formulate policy analyses and reports for the President and Congress as called for in the National Science Foundation Act. Participation in this workshop furthers NOAA's mission goal of serving society's need for weather and water information.

Contact: Roger Pulwarty