The Physical Sciences Division (PSD) conducts weather and climate research to observe and understand Earth's physical environment, and to improve weather and climate predictions on global-to-local scales

Announcements

PSD SEMINAR – AUG 13

Speaker: Erin Kalina (ESRL/PSD)
Title: Plowable hailstorms and hurricanes: Using novel observing platforms to improve forecasts of extreme weather events. [Details]

REACHING OUT

Penland and Hartten with studentCecile Penland (left) and Leslie Hartten (right) with young scientist Ma'Ko'Quah Abigail Jones are featured in Nature Geoscience piece by UCAR's Rebecca Haacker about the collaborative culture needed to address lack of diversity among geoscientists. (7/31/15)

HEADING TO ALASKA

Gijs de BoerOver the next two weeks, Gijs de Boer and colleagues will deploy a custom, light unmanned aircraft to better understand the Arctic atmosphere. Follow his blog about the experiment. (7/31/15)

PSD SEMINAR – AUG 13

Speaker: Erin Kalina (ESRL/PSD)
Title: Plowable hailstorms and hurricanes: Using novel observing platforms to improve forecasts of extreme weather events. [Details]

Research Highlights

Interpreting Climate Conditions
Explaining evolving climate conditions and assessing their impacts, particularly at regional or local levels
AR animation Atmospheric Rivers
Narrow corridors of concentrated moisture in the atmosphere that can produce dangerous storms when striking land
arctic Arctic Climate Observations
Understanding the mechanisms that control the changing Arctic climate through detailed observations
hurricane Improving Hurricane Intensity Forecasts – Atmospheric observations, laboratory experiments & computer modeling studies to improve measurements of air-sea processes under hurricane conditions
dustbowl 20th Century Reanalysis
A global atmospheric dataset spanning 1871 to 2012 to place current atmospheric patterns into a historical perspective
radar Improving Hydrologic Forecasts & Warnings – NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT): Regional experiments to help determine the most useful new tools for improving precipitation & runoff forecasting methods