Help
In order to help ensure that this set of tools remain available, we would greatly appreciate feedback on its use, particularly in the classroom, for presentations or for research. Mail to Cathy Smith at (cathy.smith@noaa.gov).

Background Information
Related Plot/Analysis Tools
Some PSD datasets and products are not up-to-date due to a system problem. We are working on a fix.
 

Web-based Reanalyses Intercomparison Tools (WRIT)

Early Release: Web-based Reanalysis Intercomparison Tools (WRIT) for Analysis and Comparison of Reanalyses and Other Datasets from BAMS, 2014.

PSD is creating a set of web-based reanalyses comparison tools. Our first tool is a monthly plotting page that allows users to plot from various reanalyses. Plots include means, anomalies and climatologies. Users can also difference the various reanalyses for all three types of statistics (for any overlapping date in the reanalyses). Composites (averaging multiple dates) are available as well. We will add the ability to use our available climate timeseries (e.g. PNA) or your own time series to composite on.

Our second tool is a monthly timeseries extractor/analyzer. It extracts timeseries at specified lat/lon or lat/lon ranges and either plots the data, plots differences between reanalyses or does other types of analyses. We plan to add climate index timeseries to the page as well for comparison with the gridded reanalyses data. We may also add observational datasets.

Current Web Tools

WRIT mapping pageWRIT time-series pageWRIT trajectory page

Future Products

We are exploring the feasibility of various tools. The features we hope to have are:

  • Daily time scale composites
  • Sub-Daily composites
  • Temporal correlations of variables with index time series
  • Spatial correlation comparing different reanalyses
  • Creation and comparison of index timeseries such as the PNA from the various reanalyses

Comments and suggestions for the page can be added to the reanalyses.org WRIT page or emailed to the ESRL/PSD webmaster.

WRIT is supported in part by NOAA/ESRL Physical Sciences Division, the NOAA Climate Program Office, and the US Department of Energy's Office of Science (BER)